Learning styles don’t exist

I’ve always been sceptical of the idea of ‘learning styles’. Psychological models of learning and memory suggest we use all of our sensory modalities to learn (it depends upon what we’re learning). The questionnaires used to ‘measure’ VAK preferences are laughably poor (‘I hear you’ = A, ‘I see what you mean’ = V, ‘I feel you have a point’ = K). We want children to process information at a semantic level (i.e. understand what it means) rather than more superficial levels of processing. Finally, I have concerns that VAK systems unfairly label children – and lead them to believe they are limited in the way they can learn.

Anyway, here’s Daniel Willingham explaining the point with more clarity …

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8 Responses to Learning styles don’t exist

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  4. bt0558 says:

    I believe Dan Willingham is very precise when he speaks on this subject. His assertions are very specific as are the defitions of terms (including ‘learning styles’)

    I think maybe you should ass the words…”among other things” to your statement above which says…” Psychological models of learning and memory suggest we use all of our sensory modalities to learn (it depends upon what we’re learning)”

    ie…perhaps it should say ‘Psychological models of learning and memory suggest we use all of our sensory modalities to learn (it depends upon what we’re learning, among other things)’

    Like

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