Tag Archives: Evidence

What really improves teacher quality?

In an interesting article for the Fabian Society, Andrew Old discusses the problems inherent in the desire to raise the quality of teaching. “‘Focusing on teacher quality’ … sounds agreeable, but much of the detail will be impossibly difficult to … Continue reading

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Posted in Education policy | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments

Education research could learn from climate change reporting.

The causal influences on educational outcomes are complex and uncertain, leading some commentators to exaggerate or dismiss research findings in accordance to their ideological positions. However, education isn’t the only field of science which deals with trying to identify the … Continue reading

Posted in Research Lead | Tagged , | 3 Comments

Does teaching style really matter?

In the debate between more traditional and progressive approaches to teaching, one of the factors that serves to polarise positions are the unfair stereotypes of teaching style. Those favouring direct instruction are frequently painted as promoting ‘Gradgrind’ style rote-learning – … Continue reading

Posted in General teaching | Tagged , , , , | 5 Comments

An evidence based teaching profession shouldn’t deal in absolutes

Really interesting blog article by James Richardson on the EEF website – where he makes a number of excellent points about evidence in education. An evidence based teaching profession shouldn’t deal in absolutes. Rarely will there be a definitive answer … Continue reading

Posted in Research Lead | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

‘Killing’ with kindness and the dangers of differentiation

Towards the end of last year, the newspapers appeared full of negative reports about teachers holding low expectations of students. Students from poorer socioeconomic backgrounds (especially white working class children and black children) are underachieving in schools and one of … Continue reading

Posted in General teaching | Tagged , , , , , | 9 Comments

A toast to the death of pedagogy

The original meaning of ‘pedagogue’ was apparently a slave who escorted Roman children to school. The term ‘pedagogy’ is almost universally equated with constructivist theories of learning – certainly whenever I hear the term, I think of Piaget, Vygotsky, et … Continue reading

Posted in General teaching | Tagged , , , | 10 Comments

Improving the effectiveness of homework

Interesting study published this week in Educational Psychology Review this week claiming that by making 3 relatively small changes to homework significantly improved outcomes. Rice study: Simple changes to homework improved student learning The study alternated the type of homework … Continue reading

Posted in General teaching | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

Everyone starts with an ‘A’: Is fear a better motivator than aspiration?

A recent study by the RSA (Royal Society for the encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce) argues that teachers should consider giving all students an ‘A’ grade at the start of the year on the basis that there is a … Continue reading

Posted in Psychology for teachers | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

The effects and impact of AfL

Since Black and Wiliam published ‘Inside the Black Box’ in 1998, AfL strategies have dominated a great deal of professional development time, had significant influence on national education policy and has become an unquestioned feature of ‘good practice’. However, to … Continue reading

Posted in General teaching | Tagged , , | 9 Comments

Urban Legends in Education

This June 2013 article takes a critical look at three pervasive myths that continue to pop up in education. The first legend is one of learners as digital natives for whom ‘old’ media and methods used in teaching/learning no longer … Continue reading

Posted in Psychology for teachers | Tagged , , | 1 Comment