Tag Archives: Working memory

Has the marshmallow melted? Interventions involving executive functioning may have little effect.

What are executive functions? Executive functioning is, in some ways, a pesky cognitive ability to define as it’s implicated in so many different functions. It’s a hypothesised capacity for things like problem solving, reasoning, planning and organisation, inhibiting action or … Continue reading

Posted in Psychology for teachers | Tagged , , | 8 Comments

What is active learning?

“The art of remembering is the art of thinking . . . our conscious effort should not be so much to impress or retain (knowledge) as to connect it with something already there” William James, 1890 “Memory is the residue … Continue reading

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The Working Memory Model – a brief guide for teachers (and A’ level students)

It’s interesting to see how cognitive science has recently become interesting to teachers. The field has some useful models and findings when it comes to understanding memory and motivational processes; some of which are quite applicable to teaching. It’s worth … Continue reading

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Working memory and differentiation

‘Differentiation’ is one of those ‘slippery’ terms that can mean different things to different people. I often find some of the strategies offered to be a bit incoherent and often question how evidence-based they really are. Here’s a possible alternative … Continue reading

Posted in Psychology for teachers | Tagged , , , , , | 2 Comments

Should students listen to music when learning?

Given some of the advice circulating at the moment, I thought it apposite to post some of the evidence on this question: Blog post: Edutopia – What works in education It appears that if the task requires maths, reading or … Continue reading

Posted in General teaching | Tagged , , | 1 Comment